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Politics

Young, attractive, ambitious, conservative, and black, Nadia Naffe should have been a right-wing operative’s dream.For a time, she was.

California congressman Michael Huffington is a man of no apparent convictions, except one: that he deserves to be president of the United States. But first the multimillionaire Republican is running for the Senate. 

Nouns get all the good parts—potato, macaca, the Appalachian Trail—but this winter, in Paris, a jobbing three-syllable adjective set off a political scandal. Minable, meaning “pathetic” or “shabby,” débuted on the breakfast show “Télématin” on December 12th. 

One afternoon last month, I paid a visit to two young Republicans named Bret Jacobson and Ian Spencer, who work in a small office in Arlington, Va., situated above an antique store and adjacent to a Japanese auto shop. 

The GOP’s younger generation confronts its future.

The bronze likeness of Muammar Qaddafi’s nemesis was lying on his back in a wooden crate shrouded in the darkness of a museum warehouse. His name was Septimius Severus. Like Qaddafi, he was from what is now Libya, and for 18 years bridging the second and third centuries A.D. he ruled the Roman Empire.

Edward I. Koch, the master showman of City Hall, who parlayed shrewd political instincts and plenty of chutzpah into three tumultuous terms as New York’s mayor with all the tenacity, zest and combativeness that personified his city of golden dreams, died Friday. He was 88.

Eleven days after the massacre, Wayne LaPierre – a lifelong political operative who had steadied the National Rifle Association through many crises – stood before an American flag and soberly addressed the nation about firearms and student safety: "We believe in absolutely gun-free, zero-tolerance, totally safe schools.

Connie Bruck has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1989. She writes about business and politics. Her piece “The Politics of Perception” won the National Magazine Award for Reporting. She has twice won the Front Page Award from the Newswomen’s Club of New York, for “Deal of the Year” and “Taking Down Tupac.”

Sixty-two legislators sit on the House Armed Services Committee, the largest committee in Congress. Since January, 2011, when Republicans took control of the House, the committee has been chaired by Howard P. McKeon, who goes by Buck.

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