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I am Philip Roth. I had reason recently to read for the first time the Wikipedia entry discussing my novel “The Human Stain.” The entry contains a serious misstatement that I would like to ask to have removed. This item entered Wikipedia not from the world of truthfulness but from the babble of literary gossip—there is no truth in it at all.

AN EXCLUSIVE LOOK BEHIND THE SECRETIVE LAB'S CLOSED DOORS. SPACE ELEVATORS, TELEPORTATION, HOVERBOARDS, AND DRIVERLESS CARS: THE TOP-SECRET GOOGLE X INNOVATION LAB OPENS UP ABOUT WHAT IT DOES AND HOW IT THINKS.

The injections came without warning or explanation. As a low-ranking soldier in the Guatemalan army in 1948, Federico Ramos was preparing for weekend leave one Friday when he was ordered to report to a clinic run by US doctors.

When the Dutch cloth merchant Antonie van Leeuwenhoek looked at a drop of pond water through his home-made microscope in the 1670s, he didn’t just see tiny ‘animals’ swimming in there. 

Growing up in rural Tennessee, I was always fascinated by space. It probably had to do with watching the Apollos as a boy and dreaming of being an astronaut. When I was in high school, I started to realize that I was more interested in building the machines—in being an engineer—than in being a real scientist. Almost all of the people who the public calls “rocket scientists” actually consider themselves to be engineers.

At the elementary school in Brooklyn where I taught first grade, science was a “special,” along with dance, art, and physical education. That meant that students were delivered by their homeroom teachers to the science teacher between one and three times a week for less than an hour each time.

Two years ago, Rich Terrile appeared on Through the Wormhole, the Science Channel’s show about the mysteries of life and the universe. He was invited onto the program to discuss the theory that the human experience can be boiled down to something like an incredibly advanced, metaphysical version of The Sims.

Three hours after I gave my name and e-mail address to Michael Fertik, the CEO of Reputation.com, he called me back and read my Social Security number to me. "We had it a couple of hours ago," he said. "I was just too busy to call."

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