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David Milch, the storied mind also behind 'Deadwood,' changed television. Now, according to a lawsuit, the racetrack regular has lost his homes, owes the IRS $17 million and is on a $40-a-week allowance. Still, his supporters stay close: "He's brilliant.”

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Published in Business

Remember how simple it used to be to stay informed? People in the entertainment business do. Every weekday morning Variety and The Hollywood Reporter—the trade papers that had been around since 1905 and 1930, respectively—would arrive, their glossy pages packed with the trends and tidbits that kept the industry on its toes.

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Published in Culture

The "Mouth of the South" is no longer as he devotes his time (and $1 billion) to the U.N., jets between 28 homes and four girlfriends, misses Jane Fonda and opens up to THR about Rupert, Jerry and his abuse as a child. Says a friend: "He's definitely changed."

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Published in Business

This story first appeared in the Aug. 29 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.He was the most popular stand-up comedian of the 1960s. The most successful product pitchman of the 1970s ("Then you dip the spoon in the puddin' …"). The most iconic sitcom dad of the 1980s (and the first with an upper-middle-class African-American TV family). And soon he'll be returning to NBC with a new comedy, perhaps as early as next year. 

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Published in Crime
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