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It can be tough finding an evening activity that appeals to adults and kids, which is why the no-experience-required sunset horseback rides led by the Los Angeles Equestrian Center (480 W. Riverside Dr., 818-840-8401) are an excellent compromise.

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Published in Culture
Growing up in rural Tennessee, I was always fascinated by space. It probably had to do with watching the Apollos as a boy and dreaming of being an astronaut. When I was in high school, I started to realize that I was more interested in building the machines—in being an engineer—than in being a real scientist. Almost all of the people who the public calls “rocket scientists” actually consider themselves to be engineers.

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Published in Technology
Bold, globe-shaking visions—financed by clients with the means and the confidence—were emerging from the offices of L.A. architects Frank Gehry, Thom Mayne, Eric Owen Moss, and Ed Niles.

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Published in Technology
The hunger pangs start when the bouncer pushes you onto the sidewalk at 2 a.m. By now your other four senses have succumbed to an evening’s worth of overstimulation, but not to worry—your taste buds can take it from here.

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Published in Culture
The Echoplex and its sister stage, the Echo, form a hub for the Echo Park-area music scene. Every kind of alternative act finds its way to these gritty clubs.

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Published in Culture
Earthy materials, artisan flourishes, communal spaces—the Age of Aquarius was in full swing. Redwood, which evoked Bay Area cool, figured prominently, especially in the work of architects Donald Hensman and Conrad Buff. -

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Published in Culture
The next self-referential club from David Judaken (he also owns MyHouse) features the same superluxe design that’s been the nightlife impresario’s trademark but on a more intimate scale. Gold-studded black leather banquettes are a home away from home for scenesters and The Hills alums.

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Published in Culture
Tract developments took the demands—monetary and mental—of building a new home off the backs of postwar couples hard at work raising businesses and families. -

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Published in Business
We don’t want to spoil the surprise, so let’s just say the entrance to this upscale new rum bar is unconventional (and we’re not referring to the bleak stretch of Western Avenue that it’s on). Surprise revealed, you descend a narrow spiral staircase into what looks like a neglected Havana nightclub circa 1940, complete with a samba band and flickering bathroom lights

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Published in Culture
Space is at a premium, the environment is ailing, and the American dream—a house for everyone—is receding into the distance, at least for now. Architects are responding by taking cramped postwar boxes and transforming them with modernist additions.

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Published in Culture
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